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  #681  
Old 10-16-2018, 05:47 PM
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MadamMeow is the king of your castle.MadamMeow is the king of your castle.MadamMeow is the king of your castle.
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*wonders* Can you leave hookers to other people in your will?
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  #682  
Old 10-16-2018, 06:11 PM
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Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!
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Might be too pricey.
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  #683  
Old 10-17-2018, 11:21 AM
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What's that shit called you use with hookers? Amyl nitrate?

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  #684  
Old 10-17-2018, 06:10 PM
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Close, I'm pretty sure it's nitrite. That third molecule in the nitrate just relieves angina attacks. Where's the fun in that.
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  #685  
Old 11-06-2018, 04:53 PM
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Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!
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The Man Who Inspired Mario's Name Has Passed Away
By William Usher 5 Days Ago




One of the most iconic video game characters of all time is Mario from Nintendo's Super Mario series. The character didn't always have the name of Mario, though, and there was actually a very specific individual who helped inspire the name of the character. Sadly, that man has passed away.

According to Game Informer, Mario Segale, a real estate developer and landlord of various properties, passed away at the age of 84. According to the article, Segale was originally the landlord of the building that Nintendo operated out of way back in the day, and that, allegedly, Nintendo was oftentimes late with the rent. So, as a way to pacify the landlord, Nintendo promised to name a character after him.

This, apparently, was all in Nintendo's favor because at the time, when Shigeru Miyamoto was working on the original Donkey Kong, he only had generic names for the characters such as "Jumpman" for Mario and "Lady" for Pauline, the latter of whom recently made a return to form in Super Mario Odyssey for the Switch. The company, however, felt that the game would be a lot more marketable if the hero and characters had actual names instead of

just generic titles. Given Nintendo's relationship with the landlord, it was decided to name the character Mario to try to placate him... or, that's how one of the stories went down.

According to The Info Junkie, Mario Segale shared a likeness with the character from Donkey Kong, and it only made sense to name the character after the landlord when he came to visit the warehouse back in the 1980s as Nintendo was still getting its start in launching software (and hardware) in the United States.

Another telling of the tale is that Mario was named as such because it was a common name that the team at Nintendo heard and decided to use on the Italian plumber. Either way, the story continued to propagate throughout various inner and outer circles of gaming that Mario was named after Segale. The Game Informer article notes that Segale wasn't actually looking for the fame and tried ducking and dodging any responsibility for one of the world's most recognized corporate mascots.

In a video posted on the Nintendo UK YouTube channel featuring a Q&A with Donkey Kong designer and famed Nintendo creative director, Shigeru Miyamoto, he's directly asked if Mario was named after the landlord of the Nintendo warehouse, and in no uncertain terms, Miyamoto nods "yes" to the question.

But, even if Nintendo did name Mario after the landlord, why did Segale not want to take responsibility for the name? Well, according to the article, Segale didn't want the fame or recognition because he felt it would tarnish his real estate business. It's understandable to an extent, because sometimes getting pigeonholed for something unrelated to your business could end up harming it, especially if Segale's real estate ventures were already profitable and doing well without any connection to Nintendo.

As pointed out by Game Informer, while Segale may not have really embraced the connection to the Super Mario franchise or the character that was based on him, he's somewhat indirectly responsible for bringing a lot of joy and happiness to gamers who have fallen in love with Nintendo's products over the years.

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  #686  
Old 11-06-2018, 04:55 PM
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Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!
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Raymond Chow, Giant of Hong Kong Film Industry, Dies at 91
By Patrick Frater and Vivienne Chow November 2, 2018


Credit Kin Cheung/AP/Rex/Shutterstock




Chow was an instrumental figure in building the golden era of the Hong Kong film industry, working under Run Run Shaw at Shaw Brothers Studio and co-founding Golden Harvest in 1970. He was also among the first to bring Hong Kong films to global attention through international partnerships and distribution.

Born in Hong Kong in 1927, Chow studied journalism at St. John's University in Shanghai and began working as a reporter at the Hong Kong Tiger Standard upon returning to the city in 1949. He had a brief stint with Voice of America before leaving journalism for filmmaking when he was recruited by Shaw Brothers Studio in 1958, joining the company as the publicity chief and later became head of the production department.

He then left Shaw Brothers Studio, citing creative differences, and co-founded Golden Harvest with Leonard Ho Koon-Cheung in 1970. He reinvented industry practice by partnering with independent studios, contradicting the studio system at Shaw Brothers.

Golden Harvest was best known for discovering Lee, making him an international kung fu star and cultural icon who is still influential today. Their first film, "The Big Boss"(1971), made Lee an instant legend, setting new box office records at the time. It was then followed by "Fist of Fury"(1972) and "The Way of the Dragon" (1972). The subsequent ";Enter the Dragon" (1973) was a co-production with Warner Bros., the first co-production between Hong Kong and Hollywood.

Chan also found initial fame from filming the kung fu comedies ";Snake in the Eagle';s Shadow" (1978) and "Drunken Master" (1978), produced by Golden Harvest. The pics became a new sub-genre of kung fu movies.

Unlike many Hong Kong filmmakers, Chow was keen on venturing into the international market, particularly Hollywood. One of his most notable successes was "Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles" (1990), a screen adaptation of the comic series of the same name. The live-action film grossed more than $200 million worldwide.

But Golden Harvest suffered great financial losses during the Asian financial crisis in 1998, the same year when Chow's partner, Ho, died. Chow sold the company to China's Wu Kebo in 2007 and it changed its name to Orange Sky Golden Harvest after merging with a mainland Chinese partner.

"Mr. Chow set up Golden Harvest in the 1970s. The company has since produced a good number of movie classics, helped nurture a pool of Hong Kong talents, and brought them to the international stage. We are most grateful for his great contribution to the development of the Hong Kong film industry" said Edward Yau, Hong Kong's secretary for commerce and economic development."

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  #687  
Old 11-13-2018, 04:11 PM
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smeegs smeegs is offline
The price is wrong...BITCH!
 
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Stan Lee, the legendary Marvel Comics co-creator and publisher, has died at 95. Kirk Schenck, an attorney for Lee's daughter, J.C. Lee, confirmed to CBS News that Lee died at a Los Angeles hospital on Monday. The beloved "God of the Marvel Universe" was behind superheroes like Spider-Man, Iron Man, Hulk, Thor, the X-Men, the Avengers and the Fantastic Four. Lee was known for his cameos in Marvel movies, as well. "J.C. Lee and all of Stan Lee's friends and colleagues want to thank all of his fans and well wishers for their kind words and condolences," Schenck said in a statement. "Stan was an icon in his field. His fans loved him and his desire to interact with them. He loved his fans and treated them with the same respect and love they gave him." Lee celebrated his 95th birthday in December, but showed no signs of putting his career to rest. In 2016, he talked to "CBS Sunday Morning" about his career and said of retirement, "That's a dirty word. ... Well, you know, retired to do what? I'm doing what I want to do. So why would I want to retire from it?" Last August, he revisited his career with a tribute in Beverly Hills called "Stan Lee: Extraordinary." Ruffalo, Aisha Tyler, Lou Ferrigno, RZA and comics creator Todd McFarlane were among the speakers at the event hosted by Chris Hardwick.

Lee, who was born Stanley Martin Leiber in 1922, grew up in the Bronx during the Great Depression. He started working at a publishing house with a division called Timely Comics in 1939. That's where Lee got his start in storytelling. "I'd fill the ink wells -- in those days they used ink!" he told "Sunday Morning." "I'd run down and get them sandwiches at the drug store, and I'd proofread the pages, and sometimes in proofreading I'd say, 'You know, this sentence doesn't sound right. It ought to be written like this.' 'Well, go ahead and change it!' They didn't care!" Lee helped shape characters like Destroyer, Father Time and Jack Frost at Timely Comics. Later, when he joined the army, he found that his skills were best used drawing. He illustrated a poster telling soldiers how not to get VD. "I drew a little soldier, very proudly," he recalled. "And he's saying, 'VD? Not me!' as he walks in. They must have printed a hundred trillion of those! I think I won the war single-handedly with that poster!" On Sunday, his Twitter account revealed that Lee's official title in the army was "playwright" in honor of Veterans Day.

By the 1960s, Timely Comics became Marvel Comics, and Lee was using his pen to inject social issues into his art. That's when he created Spider-Man. "I saw a fly crawling on a wall, and I thought, 'Gee, what if a guy could stick to walls like an insect?" Lee recalled. "That sounds good. So I started trying to think of some names. Insect-Man? Nah. Mosquito-Man? Nah. And then I got to Spider-Man. Spider-Man, ooh, that sounds dramatic! And if he has spider power, he can shoot a web also. And he could swing ... oh man! "And then I figured I'd make him a teenager, and I figured I would do the unthinkable: I'd give him personal problems. "I ran into my publisher and I said, 'Have I got an idea for you! His name is Spider-Man ...' And I couldn't get any further. He said, 'Stan, that is the worst idea I have ever heard!'" Of course, his publisher was wrong, and Spider-Man sparked the "Marvel Revolution." In spite of Lee's inextricable ties to Marvel, the relationship was a fraught one due to legal issues. Lee never owned the characters, and found himself cut out of many profits. "I try not to think about it," he said. "I'm having too much fun with the rest of my life. There's no point going back and saying I should have done this, or I could have done that. You know, what does it gain you?" Lee certainly had fun with cameos in Marvel movies, dating back to 1989. In 2018 alone, he appeared in "Black Panther," "Ant Man and the Wasp," "Deadpool 2," "Avengers: Infinity War" and "Venom."

Lee sued Marvel in 2002 and settled with the comic book giant for an undisclosed seven-figure amount. He was also given the title Chairman Emeritus of Marvel Enterprises. In February, Lee was hospitalized, but a spokesperson for Lee told CBS News, "Stan is doing well and feeling good, he is staying there for a few days for some checkups as a safety precaution." Last July, Lee's wife, Joan, died at 93. The couple had been married 69 years and shared a daughter, Joan.
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I'ld suck it.

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  #688  
Old 11-16-2018, 11:48 AM
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Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!Frothy Afterbirth ain't your mother fucking puppet, fool!
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Country Music Hall of Fame and Grand Ole Opry member, Roy Clark Dies at 85
November 16, 2018 Bethany Bowman



Roy Clark, the legendary ‘superpicker’, Grammy, CMA and ACM award winner, Country Music Hall of Fame and Grand Ole Opry member and co-host of the famed ‘Hee Haw’ television series, died today at the age of 85 due to complications from pneumonia at home in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Roy Clark’s decade-defying success could be summed up in one word — sincerity. Sure, he was one of the world’s finest multi-instrumentalists, and one of the first cross-over artists to land singles on both the pop and country charts. He was the pioneer who turned Branson, Mousori to the live music capital of the world (the Ozark town today boasts more seats than Broadway). And his talents turned Hee Haw into the longest-running syndicated show in television history.

But the bottom line for Roy Clark was the honest warmth he gave to his audiences. Bob Hope summed it up when he told Roy, “Your face is like a fireplace.”

“A TV camera goes right through your soul,” says the man who starred on Hee Haw for 24 years and was a frequent guest host for Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show. “If you’re a bad person, people pick that up. I’m a firm believer in smiles. I used to believe that everything had to be a belly laugh. But I’ve come to realize that a real sincere smile is mighty powerful.”

For a man who didn’t taste major success until he was 30, the key was not some grand plan but rather taking everything in its own time. “Sure,” he said, “I had dreams of being a star when I was 18. I could’ve pushed it too, but it wouldn’t have happened any sooner. I’m lucky. What’s happened has happened in spite of me.”

In fact, that’s what Clark titled his autobiography, My Life — In Spite of Myself! with Marc Elliot (Simon & Shuster, 1994). The book reminded many that there is much more to Roy Clark than fast fingers and a quick wit.

That he was raised in Washington, D.C., often surprises people. Born Roy Linwood Clark on April 15, 1933, in Meherrin, Virginia, his family moved to D.C. when he was a youngster.

His father played in a square dance band and took him to free concerts by the National Symphony and by various military bands. “I was subjected to different kinds of music before I ever played. Dad said, ‘Never turn your ear off to music until your heart hears it–because then you might hear something you like.'”

Beginning on banjo and mandolin, he was one of those people “born with the music already in them.” His first guitar, a Sears Silvertone, came as a Christmas present when he was 14.

That same year, 1947, he made his first TV appearance. He was 15 when he earned $2 for his first paid performance, with his dad’s band. In the fertile, diverse musical soil of cosmopolitan D.C., he began playing bars and dives on Friday and Saturday nights until he was playing every night and skipping school–eventually dropping out at 15. “Music was my salvation, the thing I loved most and did best. Whatever was fun, I’d go do that.”

The guitar wizard soon went on tour with country legends such as Hank Williams and Grandpa Jones. After winning a national banjo competition in 1950, he was invited to perform at the Grand Ole Opry, which led to shows with Red Foley and Ernest Tubb. Yet he’d always return to D.C. to play not only country, but jazz, pop, and early rock’n’roll (he’s prominently featured in the recent book Capitol Rock); to play with black groups and white groups; to play fast, to even play guitar with his feet. In 1954, he joined Jimmy Dean and the Texas Wildcats, appearing in clubs and on radio and TV, and even backing up Elvis Presley.

Roy Clark, the legendary ‘superpicker’, Grammy, CMA and ACM award winner, Country Music Hall of Fame and Grand Ole Opry member and co-host of the famed ‘Hee Haw’ television series, died today at the age of 85 due to complications from pneumonia at home in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Roy Clark’s decade-defying success could be summed up in one word — sincerity. Sure, he was one of the world’s finest multi-instrumentalists, and one of the first cross-over artists to land singles on both the pop and country charts. He was the pioneer who turned Branson, Mousori to the live music capital of the world (the Ozark town today boasts more seats than Broadway). And his talents turned Hee Haw into the longest-running syndicated show in television history.

But the bottom line for Roy Clark was the honest warmth he gave to his audiences. Bob Hope summed it up when he told Roy, “Your face is like a fireplace.”

“A TV camera goes right through your soul,” says the man who starred on Hee Haw for 24 years and was a frequent guest host for Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show. “If you’re a bad person, people pick that up. I’m a firm believer in smiles. I used to believe that everything had to be a belly laugh. But I’ve come to realize that a real sincere smile is mighty powerful.”

For a man who didn’t taste major success until he was 30, the key was not some grand plan but rather taking everything in its own time. “Sure,” he said, “I had dreams of being a star when I was 18. I could’ve pushed it too, but it wouldn’t have happened any sooner. I’m lucky. What’s happened has happened in spite of me.”

In fact, that’s what Clark titled his autobiography, My Life — In Spite of Myself! with Marc Elliot (Simon & Shuster, 1994). The book reminded many that there is much more to Roy Clark than fast fingers and a quick wit.

That he was raised in Washington, D.C., often surprises people. Born Roy Linwood Clark on April 15, 1933, in Meherrin, Virginia, his family moved to D.C. when he was a youngster.

His father played in a square dance band and took him to free concerts by the National Symphony and by various military bands. “I was subjected to different kinds of music before I ever played. Dad said, ‘Never turn your ear off to music until your heart hears it–because then you might hear something you like.'”

Beginning on banjo and mandolin, he was one of those people “born with the music already in them.” His first guitar, a Sears Silvertone, came as a Christmas present when he was 14.

That same year, 1947, he made his first TV appearance. He was 15 when he earned $2 for his first paid performance, with his dad’s band. In the fertile, diverse musical soil of cosmopolitan D.C., he began playing bars and dives on Friday and Saturday nights until he was playing every night and skipping school–eventually dropping out at 15. “Music was my salvation, the thing I loved most and did best. Whatever was fun, I’d go do that.”

The guitar wizard soon went on tour with country legends such as Hank Williams and Grandpa Jones. After winning a national banjo competition in 1950, he was invited to perform at The Grand Ole Opry, which led to shows with Red Foley and Ernest Tubb. Yet he’d always return to D.C. to play not only country, but jazz, pop, and early rock’n’roll (he’s prominently

featured in the recent book Capitol Rock); to play with black groups and white groups; to play fast, to even play guitar with his feet. In 1954, he joined Jimmy Dean and the Texas Wildcats, appearing in clubs and on radio and TV, and even backing up Elvis Presley.

But in 1960, he was 27 and still scrambling. An invitation to open for Wanda Jackson at the Golden Nugget in Las Vegas proved to be his big break. It led to his own tour, on the road for 345 straight nights at one stretch, and when he returned to Vegas in 1962, he came back as a headliner and recording star, with his debut album The Lightning Fingers Of Roy Clark. The next year, he had his first hit, The Tips Of My Fingers, a country song that featured an orchestra and string section. “We didn’t call it crossover then but I guess that’s what it was,” he says. “We didn’t aim for that, because if you aim for both sides you miss them both. But we just wanted to be believable.”

He was–on record and on TV, where his first appearances in 1963 on ‘The Tonight Show’ and ‘American Bandstand’ showcased his easygoing attitude and rural sense of humor.

“Humor is a blessing to me. My earliest recollections are of looking at something and seeing the lighter side. But it’s always spontaneous. I couldn’t write a comedy skit for someone else.”

Throughout the ’60s, Clark recorded several albums, toured constantly, and appeared on TV variety shows from Carson to Mike Douglas to Flip Wilson. “I was the token bumpkin. It became, ‘Let’s get that Clark guy. He’s easy to get along with.'” Then came ‘Hee Haw.’ A countrified ‘Laugh-In’ with music, shot in Nashville, ‘Hee Haw’ premiered in 1969. Co-starring Clark and Buck Owens, it was an immediate hit. Though CBS canceled the show after two-and-a-half years, despite ranking in the Top 20, the series segued into syndication, where it remained until 1992. “I long ago realized it was not a figure of speech when people come up to me and say they grew up watching me since they were ‘that big’.”

A generation or two has also grown up listening to him. In 1969, Yesterday, When I Was Young charted Top 20 Pop and #9 Country (Billboard). Including Yesterday, Clark has had 23 Top 40 country hits, among them eight Top 10s: The Tips Of My Fingers (#10, 1963), I Never Picked Cotton (#5) and Thank God And Greyhound You’re Gone (#6, 1970), The Lawrence Welk-Hee Haw Counter Revolution Polka (#9, 1972), Come Live With Me (#1) and Somewhere Between Love And Tomorrow (#2, 1973), and If I Had It To Do All Over Again (#2, 1976).

In addition, his 12-string guitar rendition of Malaguena is considered a classic and, in 1982, he won a Grammy (Best Country Instrumental Performance) for Alabama Jubilee.

A consummate musician, no matter the genre, he co-starred with Petula Clark at Caesar’s Palace, became the first country artist to headline at the Montreux International Jazz Festival and appeared in London on ‘The Tom Jones Show.’ Clark was amazed when guitarists from England credited his BBC specials and performances on variety TV shows with the likes of the Jackson 5 for inspiring them to play. But the highlight of his career, he said, was a pioneering, sold-out 1976 tour of the then-Soviet Union. “Even though they didn’t know the words, there were tears in their eyes when I played Yesterday. Folks there said we wouldn’t realize in our lifetime the good we’d accomplished, just because of our pickin’ around.”

When he returned in 1988 to now-Russia, Clark was hailed as a hero. Though he’d never bought a joke and doesn’t read music, the self-described, and proud of it, “hillbilly singer” was that rare entertainer with popularity worthy of a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and respect worthy of the Academy of Country Music’s Pioneer Award and membership in the Gibson (Guitar) Hall of Fame; an entertainer who could star in Las Vegas (the first country artist inducted into its Entertainers Hall of Fame), in Nashville (becoming the 63rd member of the Grand Ole Opry in 1987), and at Carnegie Hall. Roy was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2009.

Roy’s many good deeds on behalf of his fellow man led to him receiving the 1999 Minnie Pearl Humanitarian of the Year Award from TNN’s Music City News Awards. In October 2000, he was inducted into the Oklahoma Music Hall of Fame, and he was actively involved with school children who attend the Roy Clark Elementary School in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

From his home in Tulsa, where he moved in 1974 with Barbara, his wife of 61 years, Clark continued to tour extensively. For him — and for his legion of loyal fans — live performance was what it was all about. “Soon as you hit the edge of the stage and see people smiling and know they’re there to hear you, it’s time to have fun. I keep a band of great young people around me, and we’re not musically restrained. It’s not about ‘let’s do it correct’ but ‘let’s do it right.’”

At the end of each of Roy’s concerts, he would tell the audience, “We had to come, but you had a choice. Thanks for being here.” With responding smiles, audiences continued to thank Roy for being there, too.

Roy is preceded in death by his beloved grandson Elijah Clark who passed at the age of fourteen on September 24, 2018. Roy is survived by Barbara, his wife of sixty-one years, his sons Roy Clark II and wife Karen, Dr. Michael Meyer and wife Robin, Terry Lee Meyer, Susan Mosier and Diane Stewart, and his grandchildren: Brittany Meyer, Michael Meyer, Caleb Clark, Josiah Clark and his sister, Susan Coryell.

A memorial celebration will be held in the coming days in Tulsa, Oklahoma, details forthcoming.

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